Episode #35: Long-Haul Truckers May be at Greater Risk for CRC (education is the key to increasing screening rates)

Dr. Michael Weinstein talks with Ellen Brooks of the Men’s Health Inequities (MHI) Research Lab at the University of Utah School of Medicine, who is a co-author of a new study on the prevalence of colorectal cancer (CRC) among long-haul truck drivers.

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Episode #33: What do Colonoscopy and Cabernet Have in Common? (catching up with One GI’s Mike Dragutsky)

This week, Dr. Fred Rosenberg catches up with Dr. Mike Dragutsky, who is a practicing gastroenterologist at Gastro One, and chairman of One GI, a managed services organization with practices in five states that was envisioned, created and is guided by physicians.

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Episode #32: Stories are Powerful (how the Faces of Blue Campaign works to increase CRC Screening)

Dr. Michael Weinstein of Capital Digestive Care talks to Erin Peterson of the Colon Cancer Coalition and Dr. Milena Gould Suarez of Baylor College of Medicine about the Faces of Blue campaign and the patients, physicians, and family members who share their experiences with colorectal cancer.

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Episode #31: Should Adenoma Detection Rates be Made Public? (other quality measures are important to patients too)

Dr. Michael Weinstein of Capital Digestive Care talks to Dr. Costas Kefalas from Akron Digestive Disease Consultants about his work as the president of the GI Quality Improvement Consortium (GIQuIc), a benchmarking registry that tracks quality measures such as cecal intubation rates, withdrawal times and adenoma detection rates.

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